Quantcast TROPIC SURVIVAL - 10330_122

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
Beware of flash floods when you are traveling along dry watercourses, particularly in the vicinity of mountains. You should never make camp in a stream bed; while rain in the desert is scare, storms can and do produce flash flooding very quickly. TROPIC SURVIVAL When used with reference to survival, the term tropics refers primarily to jungles, for those are the parts of the tropics that present survival problems distinctly different from those in other parts of the world. Hazards Most stories about the animals, snakes, spiders, and nameless terrors of the jungle are pure bunk. You are probably safer from sudden death in the jungle than in most big cities. You will probably never see a poisonous snake or a large animal. What may scare you most are the howls, screams, and crashing sounds made by noisy monkeys, birds, and insects. The real dangers of the tropics are the insects, many of which pass on diseases. Probably the worst disease is malaria, which is transmitted by the mosquito. That is why the survival kit provides a mosquito headnet. Wear this net regularly, especially at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are the thickest; use insect repellent, wear gloves, and take Atabrine pills too. A smudge fire also helps keep mosquitoes away, especially at dawn and dusk. There are many other insects and pests in the jungle—ticks, leeches, scorpions, centipedes, and spiders, to name just a few. Stings or bites from these insects can create infection and cause illness. Frequently check your body and your clothing for insects and get rid of them. Beware of scratches also. In the jungle even the slightest scratch can cause serious infection within hours. Clothing As with the Arctic and the desert, clothing in the tropics serves as a protection against exposure, insects, and plant life. You should keep your sleeves rolled down and buttoned. Tuck the legs of your pants into your socks and keep your shoes on. This may help keep out unwanted insects such as ticks, leeches, and ants. Always wear full clothing in the tropics. By wearing your clothing loosely, your body will be cooler. Change your clothing as often as it is practical. Remember dirty clothes may lead to a skin infection; therefore, they should be washed daily, especially your socks. Food and Water Food and water are plentiful in the jungle. It is a proven fact that a person can survive in the jungle and actually like it, if provided with a basic knowledge of how to use the animals and other food found in the jungle. When you are selecting food in the jungle, watch the monkeys. Almost everything a monkey eats is eatable by humans. There are fish in all jungle streams. Eat only fish that have scales and look typically like a fish. Fish that have slimy skin and unusually shaped bodies are to be avoided. Shelter Night in the jungle comes very fast. So prepare for bed early. In the jungle you need more sleep than usual to keep up your energy and strength and to maintain resistance against disease. Try to pick a campsite on a knoll or high spot in an open place well away from swamps. You will be bothered less by mosquitoes, the ground will be dryer, and there will be more chances of a breeze. Don’t build a shelter under large trees or trees with dead limbs. They may fall and wreck your camp or cause injury. Don’t sleep or build a shelter under coconut trees. In the wet jungle forest, you will need shelter from the dampness. If you stay with the plane, use it for shelter. Try to make it mosquitoproof by covering the openings with netting or parachute cloth. In mountainous jungle, the nights are cold. Get out of the wind. Make a fire a few feet from a cliff or against a log or rock pile, and build your shelter so that you get reflected heat. Arrange the reflector so that the fire doesn’t blow toward you. FIRE MAKING You may need fire for warmth, for keeping dry, for signaling, for cooking, and for purifying water. Do not build a big fire. Small fires require less fuel, are easier to control, and their heat can be concentrated. In cold weather small fires arranged in a circle are much more effective than one large fire. 5-34



Aviation News
U.S. National Honors for CH-46 Tomorrow
The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum will honor the...
aviationtoday.com
Australia’s Ferra Engineering to Provide Initial Production for Triton UAS
Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton. Photo: Northrop Grumman [Avionics Today 07-31-2015]...
aviationtoday.com
Insitu Wins Contract to Build Six RQ-21A Blackjack UAS for US Navy
RQ-21A Blackjack UAS. Photo: Navair [Avionics Today 07-31-2015] Insitu has...
aviationtoday.com
Embraer, Bombardier See Delays, Depreciation and Market Softness in Q2
[Avionics Today 07-31-2015] Second quarter 2105 earnings for both biz...
aviationtoday.com
DOT Celebrates 25th Anniversary of ADA
A look at our recent past and a peek into...
faa.gov
Four Corners of the Country
July 30- The July/August 2015 issue of FAA Safety Briefing...
faa.gov
UH-X Order Could Boost 412 Commercial Sales
Japan’s order for 150 military versions of Bell Helicopter’s 412EPI...
aviationtoday.com
Australian Air Force Acquires First Boeing Growler
Amazon’s rendering of a segregated UAS airspace. Photo: Amazon [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Northrop Grumman CEO Looks to UAS to Grow Revenues
[Avionics Today 07-29-2015] Northrop Grumman Chief Executive Officer Wesley Bush...
aviationtoday.com
Engility Wins Contract to Support US Air Force GPS
[Avionics Today 07-28-2015] The U.S. Air Force has awarded TASC,...
aviationtoday.com
US Navy Awards Harris Corporation $29 Million Avionics Contract
F/A 18 Super Hornet. Photo: Boeing [Avionics Today 07-28-2015] The...
aviationtoday.com
First Bell 525 Delivery Slated for 2017
The 525 Relentless won’t be delivered to its first operators...
aviationtoday.com
Australian Military Training System Approved for Airbus Helicopters H135
Airbus Helicopters has achieved Factory Acceptance of HATS01, the first...
aviationtoday.com
Airbus Helicopters H135 Receives Factory Acceptance for HATS
Airbus Helicopters has achieved Factory Acceptance of HATS01, the first...
aviationtoday.com
Rockwell Collins Sees Softening Aftermarket Amid Rising Connectivity
Rockwell Collins connectivity segment looks to offset other market softness....
aviationtoday.com
Harris and CPqD to Monitor CNS Systems for Brazilian Air Force ATC
[Avionics Today 07-27-2015] Brazilian Air Force Air Traffic Control (ATC)...
aviationtoday.com
Harris Exec Outlines Electronic Warfare Strategy
Andy Dunn, vice president of business development at Harris. Photo:...
aviationtoday.com
Northrop Grumman Lays Out Fifth Generation C4ISR Framework
[Avionics Today 07-24-2015] Northrop Grumman Corporation has set out a...
aviationtoday.com
New Technologies to Boost Future Military HUD Sales
[Avionics Today 07-24-2015] A new Technavio report on the Head-Up...
aviationtoday.com
Rockwell Collins to Upgrade Communications for E-4B
E-4B aircraft. Photo: Boeing [Avionics Today 07-23-2015] Boeing has selected...
aviationtoday.com


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +