Quantcast AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION

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Pacific) commands or with one of the several industrial-type naval aviation depots. Soon after becoming a Navy member, you realize that more leadership is required in the higher rates. Advancement not only involves the acquisition of superior knowledge, it also requires demonstrated ability to handle people. This ability increases in importance as you advance through the petty officer rates. Responsibilities concerning the most im- portant aspects of naval leadership are outlined in the latest revision of the United States Navy Regulations. Naval leadership means the art of accomplishing the Navy’s mission through people. It is the sum of those qualities of intellect, of human understanding, and of moral character that enables a person to inspire and manage a group of people successfully. Therefore, effective leadership is based on personal example, good management practices, and moral responsibility. The term leadership includes all three of these elements. If this threefold objective is carried out effectively in every command, the program will make better leaders of Navy personnel in their present and future assignments. As an AZ advances up the leadership ladder, his/her worth to the Navy will be judged on the amount of efficient work from subordinates rather than the actual work done by the AZ leader. For further information on the practical application of leadership and supervision, refer to the latest edition of Military Requirements for Petty Officer 3, NAVEDTRA 10044-A, and Military Requirements for Petty Officer 2, NAVEDTRA 10045-A. A large number of the personnel striking for the AZ rating, and almost all lower rated AZs, are assigned to the aircraft maintenance depart- ment of a squadron, ship, or shore station. Most of the duties performed by these personnel are productive-type functions in support of other members of the department. Therefore, it is important that each AZ have a working knowledge of the NAMP and the organizational structure of aircraft maintenance departments. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION In most operating units (or activities), the aircraft maintenance department is the largest department. Its primary efforts are to support the unit’s mission. The operations department has the responsibility for carrying out the unit’s mission of flight operations (other than ferry or test flights) by Navy aircraft. In support of the unit’s mission, the objective of the maintenance department is to maintain all assigned aircraft in a state of full mission capability. An aircraft in this category is considered to be in a material condition of readiness to safely perform all of its intended missions. All aircraft maintenance departments are organized along the same general lines; that is, a standard organization is used throughout the Navy. The advantages of having a standard organization can be seen if you consider what happens when you are transferred between aircraft maintenance activities. When you are transferred to another activity, you know that the work centers in both old and new activities have the same code numbers and names; that the officers occupy similar billets (although names and ranks will be different); and that you will perform clerical functions using the same publications, forms, and procedures. In other words, when you transfer from one aviation maintenance activity to another, you can, in a very short time, perform in your new unit. MAINTENANCE CONCEPTS, LEVELS, AND TYPES An important objective of the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP) is to achieve and maintain maximum material readiness, safety, and conservation of material. This objective is accomplished through command attention, policy direction, technical direction, management, and administration of all programs affecting activities responsible for aviation maintenance, including associated material and equipment. All aviation activities base their policies, plans, programs, and procedures on the NAMP. The NAMP is founded upon the three-level maintenance concept,    and is the authority governing the management of organizational-, intermediate- and depot-level aviation mainte- nance. It provides the management tools required for efficient and economical use of personnel and material resources in performing maintenance. It also provides the basis for establishing standard organizations, procedures, and responsibilities for the accomplishment of all maintenance of naval aircraft, associated material, and equipment. The division of maintenance into three levels allows management to classify maintenance functions by levels; assign responsibility for maintenance 1-2



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