Quantcast DUTIES OF A RECEPTIONIST

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
. If any personal articles are kept in the desk, place them in a separate drawer. . At the end of the day, clear everything possible from the top of the desk, set straight any articles that must remain on top, and close all drawers. DUTIES OF A RECEPTIONIST At one time or another, you will probably receive visitors and greet official callers at your activity or office. The manner in which you conduct yourself and the impression you make determines, to a great extent, the visitor’s initial impression of the whole organization. Often the receptionist’s manner is apparent, even before moving or speaking, and it sets the tone for what follows. When receiving and greeting visitors, you should be guided by a few simple rules of business and courtesy. An office is a place of business, so you should show that you are there for work. In all offices, you will have work other than attending to visitors. If, for short intervals, you actually have nothing to do, learn by watching or helping other AZs. (You should not engage in idle talk with other personnel during these occasions.) Your desk may be right in line for the chronic stop-and-chatter person from a nearby office. Be pleasant but do not encourage incidental visiting. Most people will leave if they see they are interrupting your work. You must not, however, give people coming to the office the impression that you are too busy to help them. As an AZ, you should understand that one of your most important functions is to be of help to other maintenance personnel, and no reasonable request should be too much trouble. You should be polite, pleasant, and considerate at all times, even with people whose requests seem a bit unreasonable. You should retain your composure and good manners. If you do not already know the visitor, you should ask the individual’s name. You might write it on a slip of paper to hand to the person the visitor wishes to see. You should listen carefully to inquiries. Use intelligence and imagination in replying. Do not expect the visitor to know all about the office and the people in it. When referring to Lieutenant Smith, for example, you should make sure that the visitor knows where Lieutenant Smith’s desk is located. If possible, take the visitor to Lieutenant Smith, introduce him, and briefly state the visitor’s business. If you cannot help, suggest another source that may be used. This is where broad on-the-job experience is useful. You should never let people leave feeling they have run into a blank wall. A good receptionist is, to some extent, a buffer for the other people in the office. Time can often be saved if the receptionist knows the answer. You should be careful, however, to know just how far to go on your own and when it is better to let someone else take over. When the people in the office are especially busy, the receptionist should protect them as much as possible without denying legitimate requests or causing visitors to wait an unreason- able length of time. If a delay cannot be avoided, it may be feasible to suggest calling the visitor when the person to be seen is free, or find out whether anyone else can help. TELEPHONE PROCEDURES When a small child first tries to talk on the telephone, the child is likely to nod the head for yes instead of speaking. Many adults make, to a lesser degree, the same mistake. They forget how important facial expression and gestures are in face-to-face conversation and that these factors are missing on the telephone. Remember the old expression,   “When you say that, smile.” Misunderstandings can arise on the telephone because the person at the receiving end cannot see the speaker’s expression. People sometimes develop telephone voice mannerisms that give a misleading impression. To avoid this mistake, you should listen critically now and then, and decide whether you would like to be spoken to by that voice. Is it natural? Is it pleasant? Is it friendly and yet businesslike? Remember that a conversational tone is best for telephone use. You should speak directly into the transmitter with the mouth about an inch away. Among voices to be avoided are the dull, the whining, the pompous, the too formal, and 2-3



Aviation News
ANA Holdings orders seven additional A321s
ANA’s new order further boosts presence of A320 Family in...
airbus.com
Rohde & Schwarz VCS-4G Certified for China
[Avionics Today 01-30-2015] The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC)...
aviationtoday.com
Boeing 747-8 Selected as Next Air Force One
Barack Obama leaving the current Air Force One, a VC-25....
aviationtoday.com
How NextGen is Getting Fans to the Super Bowl
January 29Football fans flying to Phoenix for the Super Bowl...
faa.gov
French Prime Minister visits Airbus Final Assembly Line in Tianjin
Over 200 Airbus A320 Family aircraft assembled so far Share...
airbus.com
Lockheed Martin Reports Strong 2014 for Aeronautics
[Avionics Today 01-29-2015] Lockheed Martin reported a strong year in...
aviationtoday.com
A new attraction in Toulouse for aviation enthusiasts: The Aeroscopia museum opens
Aviation’s past, present and future have come together in southwestern...
airbus.com
Unmanned Aircraft and NFL Football Don't Mix
January 28Many familiar sounds are associated with the Super Bowl:...
faa.gov
Turbomeca's Arriel 2N Turboshaft Receives EASA Certification
Turbomeca has received EASA type-certification for its Ariel 2N turboshaft...
aviationtoday.com
The Long Haul: Aurora’s Orion UAS Claims New Endurance Record with 80-hour flight
The Orion UAS in flight. Photo: Aurora Flight Sciences [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
RNLAF Selects Terma MASE Pod Solution for NH-90s
The Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) has contracted Terma, a...
aviationtoday.com
Australian Military’s EC135 T2+ Completes First Flight
The first Airbus EC135 T2+ helicopter in a planned fleet...
aviationtoday.com
Raytheon Absorbs Sensintel, Ups UAS Portfolio
Photo: Raytheon [Avionics Today 01-26-2015] Raytheon has acquired the privately...
aviationtoday.com
Exelis Wins Redesign Contract for US Navy’s ALQ-99 Tactical Jammer
U.S. Navy ALQ-99 aircraft. Photo: U.S. Navy by Mass Communication...
aviationtoday.com
Aircraft Asset Assessment B737-800
Market Presence. In the context of re-engining from both manufacturers,...
aviationtoday.com
FAA to Airlines: E-cigs in Checked Bags are Fire Risk
January 23As the popularity of e-cigarettes increases, the FAA wants...
faa.gov
FAA to Issue New Guidance on Sleep Apnea
January 23The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continually works with the...
faa.gov
FAA Grants Two More UAS Exemptions
January 23-The Federal Aviation Administration continues to allow expanded commercial...
faa.gov
F/A-18 Super Hornet Infrared Search and Track System Approved for Production
IRST21, shown on the F/A-18E/F. Photo: Lockheed Martin   [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Exelis Inks Contract with General Atomics for MQ-9 UAS Ejector Rack
MQ-9 UAS. Photo: U.S. Air Force [Avionics Today 01-22-2015] Exelis...
aviationtoday.com


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +