Quantcast STRIKING TOOLS

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tools results in improper maintenance. Improper maint enance results in damage to equipment and possible injury or death to you or others. SAFE MAINTENANCE PRACTICES–Always avoid placing tools on or above machinery or an electrical apparatus. Never leave tools unattended where machinery or aircraft engines are running. NEVER USE DAMAGED TOOLS – A battered screwdriver may slip and spoil the screw slot, damage other parts, or cause painful injury. A gauge strained out of shape will result in inaccurate measurements. Remember, the efficiency of craftsmen and the tools they use are determined to a great extent by the way they keep their tools. Likewise, they are frequently judged by the manner in which they handle and care for them. Anyone watching skilled craftsmen at work notices the care and precision with which they use the tools of their trade. The care of hand tools should follow the same pattern as for personal articles; that is, always keep hand tools clean and free from dirt, grease, and foreign matter.    After use, return tools promptly to their proper place in the toolbox. Improve your own efficiency by organizing your tools so that those used most frequently can be reached easily without digging through the entire contents of the box. Avoid accumulating unnecessary junk. STRIKING TOOLS Hammers, mallets, and sledges are used to apply a striking force.   The tool you select (fig. 1-1) will depend upon the intended application. HAMMERS A toolkit for nearly every rating in the Navy would not be complete without at least one hammer. In most cases, two or three are included, since they are designated according to weight (without the handle) and style or shape. The shape will vary according to the intended work. Machinists’ Hammers Machinists’ hammers are mostly used by who work with metal or around machinery. people These hammers are distinguished from carpenter hammers by a variable-shaped peen, rather than a claw, at the Figure 1-1.-Hammers mallets, and sledges. opposite end of the face (fig. 1-1). The ball-peen hammer is probably most familiar to you. The ball-peen hammer, as its name implies, has a ball that is smaller in diameter than the face. It is therefore useful for striking areas that are too small for the face to enter. Ball-peen hammers are made in different weights, usually 4, 6, 8, and 12 ounces and 1, 1 1/2, and 2 pounds. For most work a 1 1/2 pound and a 12-ounce hammer will suffice. However, a 4- or 6-inch hammer will often be used for light work such as tapping a punch to cut gaskets out of sheet gasket material. Machinists’ hammers may be further divided into hard-face and soft-face classifications. The hard-faced hammer is made of forged tool steel, while the soft-faced hammers have a head made of brass, lead, or a tightly rolled strip of rawhide. Plastic-faced hammers or solid plastic hammers with a lead core for added weight are becoming increasingly popular. Soft-faced hammers (fig. 1-1) should be used when there is danger of damaging the surface of the work, as when poundind on a machined surface. 1-2



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