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POWER PLANT SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

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The type numerals and type letter symbol are assigned consecutively by each of the services. The numerals begin as follows: !    100—Air Force !    400—Navy !    700—Army Model Indicator The third part is the model indicator. It is a dash and a model number, or a dash and a model number with a suffix letter. Each configuration of the engine has an assigned model number. Each of the services assigns a block of numbers that are used consecutively. !    100—Air Force !    400—Navy !    700—Army NOTE: If one service uses another services' designated engines, the designation remains the same unless a model change is required. Only in this case will the model indicator change to indicate the engine has been modified. F401-PW-400 is an example of a MIL-STD-1812 engine designation. !    F Turbofan !    401 Second Navy turbofan in designation system !    PW Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Division, United Aircraft Corporation !    400 First Navy model of this particular engine Q6-18. What are the two engine designation systems used to identify aircraft power plants? Q6-19. What does the letter X or Y preceding the basic designation signify? Q6-20. What are the three parts of the MIL-STD-1812 designation system? Q6-21. F401-PW-400 is an example of what engine designation system? POWER PLANT SAFETY PRECAUTIONS LEARNING OBJECTIVE: Recognize power plant safety precautions that apply to the intake ducts, exhaust area, and engine noise. Operational readiness of a maximum number of aircraft power plants is necessary if naval aviation is to successfully perform its mission. Keeping aircraft and power plants in top operating condition is the principal function of naval aviation maintenance personnel. This maintenance work must be performed without injury to personnel. Every person connected with power plant maintenance is responsible for discovering and eliminating unsafe work practices. In the following section, we will discuss a few standard safety precautions. You must follow these precautions to prevent injury to yourself or others working on or near aircraft jet engines. INTAKE DUCTS The air intake ducts of operating jet engines are an extreme hazard to personnel working near the aircraft. Ducts are also a hazard to the engine itself if the area around the front of the aircraft is not kept clear of debris. The air intake duct develops enough suction to pull an individual, or hats, eye glasses, etc., into the intake. The hazard is obviously greatest during maximum power settings. Protective screens for the ducts  are  part  of  the  aircraft's  ground-handling equipment. These screens must be installed prior to all maintenance turnups. EXHAUST AREA Jet engine exhausts create many hazards to personnel. The two most serious hazards are the high temperature and the high velocity of the exhaust gases from the tailpipe. High temperatures are present several hundred feet from the tailpipe. The closer you get to the aircraft, the higher the exhaust temperatures and the greater the danger. When a jet engine is starting, sometimes excess fuel will accumulate in the tailpipe. When this fuel ignites, long flames shoot out of the tailpipe at very high velocity. You will want to stay clear of this danger at all times. 6-19



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