Quantcast AIRCRAFT METALLIC REPAIR

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
back up the material while driving out the pin. If inaccessibility prohibits this, partially remove the rivet head by filing or with a rivet shaver. An alternative would be to file the pin flat, center punch the flat, and carefully drill out the tapered part of the pin forming the lock. 2. Pry the remainder of the locking collar out with a drift pin. 3. Use the proper size drill to drill almost completely through the rivet head. For a 1/8-inch-diameter rivet, use a number 31 drill; for a 5/32, use a number 24; and for a 3/16, use a number 15. 4. Break off the drilled head with a drift pin. 5. Drive out the remainder of the rivet with a pin that has a diameter equal to or slightly less than the rivet diameter. AIRCRAFT METALLIC REPAIR Learning Objective: Recognize the causes of damage to metallic structures and the procedures for their repair. One of the most important jobs you will encounter is the repair of damaged skin and material. All repairs must be of the highest quality and must conform to certain requirements and specifications. You must be familiar with the principle of streamlining, the behavior of various metals in high-velocity air currents, and the torsioned stress encountered during high-speed flying and maneuvering. DAMAGE REPAIRS When any part of the airframe has been damaged, the first step is to clean all grease, dirt, and paint in the vicinity of the damage so the extent of the damage may be determined. The adjacent structure must be inspected to determine what secondary damage may have resulted from the transmission of the load or loads that caused the initial damage. You should thoroughly inspect the adjacent structures for dents, scratches, abrasions, punctures, cracks, loose seams, and distortions. Check all bolted fittings that may have been damaged or loosened by the load that caused the damage to the structure. Causes of Damage Damages to the airframe are many and may vary from those that are classified as negligible to those that are so extensive that an entire member of the airframe must be replaced. The slightest damage could affect the flight characteristics of the aircraft. The most common causes of damage to the airframe are collision, stress, heat, corrosion, foreign objects, fatigue, and combat damage. COLLISION.—This type of damage is often the result of carelessness by maintenance personnel. It varies from minor damage, such as dented or broken areas of skin, to extensive damage, such as torn or crushed structural members and misalignment of the aircraft. You should exercise extreme care in all ground-handling operations. CORROSION.—Damage to airframe components and the structure caused by corrosion will develop into permanent damage or failure if not properly treated. The corrosion control section of the maintenance instructions manual describes the maximum damage limits. These limits should be checked carefully, and if they are exceeded, the component or structure must be repaired or replaced. FATIGUE.— This type of damage is more notice- able as the operating time of the aircraft accumulates. The damage will begin as small cracks, caused by vibration and other loads imposed on skin fittings and load-bearing members, where the fittings are attached. FOREIGN OBJECT.—This damage is caused by hand tools, bolts, rivets, and nuts left adrift during ground operations of the aircraft. Because of jet aircraft design, large volumes of air are required for its efficient operation. During ground operations, the inlet ducts induce a strong suction that picks up objects that are left adrift. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the area around the aircraft be clean and free of foreign material before ground operations begin. COMBAT.—Damage from enemy gunfire is usually quite extensive and often not repairable. When a projectile strikes sheet metal, it heats the metal in the vicinity of the damage. The metal 13-36



Aviation News
Airbus launches new VIP widebody cabin-concept
Introduces a new way to greater capacity, comfort and capability...
airbus.com
Erickson, U.S. Navy Contract Extended
Erickson, a global provider of aviation services for commercial and...
aviationtoday.com
Airbus to adjust A330 production rate to nine a month
Transition towards A330neo Share this Read more +...
airbus.com
US Navy’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Warfighter Achieves IOC
E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. Photo: US Navy [Avionics Today 10-17-2014]...
aviationtoday.com
DOD Looks to Performance-Based Logistics to Cut Costs
The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense....
aviationtoday.com
RJAF Acquires Robinson R44 Fleet
The Royal Jordanian Air Force (RJAF) has acquired eight Robinson...
aviationtoday.com
Qatar Airways’ first A350 XWB completes its maiden flight
First customer aircraft takes to the sky Share this Read...
airbus.com
Airbus ACJ319 highlights trend to larger cabins at NBAA
Giving customers more comfort and space in the sky Share...
airbus.com
Pratt & Whitney Deliver Seventh Lot of Propulsion Engines to DOD, Remedy Former Engine Mishaps
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter for which Pratt & Whitney supply...
aviationtoday.com
EASA certifies A350 XWB for up to 370 minute ETOPS
First new airliner ever to be approved before EIS for...
airbus.com
Airbus opens its doors to schoolgirls: “Elles du Futur - Girls for the Future of Aeronautics”
Discovering aeronautical professions Share this Read more +...
airbus.com
IndiGo signs MoU for 250 A320neo aircraft
Important endorsement for Airbus’ leading single aisle aircraft Family Share...
airbus.com
India Nears Deals to Purchase New Helicopters from Boeing
Boeing AH-64. Photo by Ernie Stephens Reuters is reporting that...
aviationtoday.com
US Navy Grants Flight Clearance to SHIELD Aviation’s ARES UAS
ARES Block C Unmanned Aerial System. Photo: PRNewsFoto/SHIELD Aviation [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Unmanned Vs. Manned: How Civil UAS is Shaping Up in Europe
[Avionics Today 10-15-2014] The European Commission, like many government agencies...
aviationtoday.com
Indian Defence Ministry Bans Finmeccanica From Bidding
An AgustaWestland AW101 on display at this year’s Farnborough airshow....
aviationtoday.com
MDA to Provide Airbus with Communication Subsystems
Airbus headquarters in Toulouse, France. Photo: Airbus [Avionics Today 10-15-2014]...
aviationtoday.com
MUOS-Manpack PRC-155 Radio Demonstrates Secure Communications for US Air Force
MUOS Manpack PRC-155 radio. Photo: General Dynamics C4 Systems [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Fighting for the Warfighter: Navy Looks to Drive NextGen Technology
Rear Adm. Mike Moran, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division...
aviationtoday.com
Rockwell Collins and Elbit Systems of America Introduce the Digital EyePiece NVCD for JHMCS
The JHMCS helmet for which the Elbit Systems digital eyepiece...
aviationtoday.com


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +