Quantcast FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
Arming is the same in any case. A regulator in the fuze converts the applied voltage to the required level and polarity. It is then applied to the energy storage unit and the 2.6-second timer. If the weapon decelerates, the Mk 31 safety device senses the deceleration and causes the retard switch to close. At 2.6 seconds, the timer completes its cycle and transfers the voltage to the rotor-actuating bellows. The bellows operate and turn the rotor to the armed position. If the weapon does not decelerate, the retard switch does not close. The 2.6-second timer continues to run. At  3.8  seconds,  the  Mk  31  safety  device  causes  the voltage  to  transfer  to  the  input  of  the  rotor-actuating bellows.  At  10.0  seconds,  the  bellows  operates  and turns the rotor to the armed position. FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-152/B  is  an  advanced  fuze  system  for use    in    general    purpose    and    penetrating    unitary warheads.  The  FMU-152/B  provides  safing,  in-flight cockpit selection, and multifunction and multiple delay arming  and  fuzing  functions.  The  FMU-152/B  is  a multifunction; multiple delay fuze system with hardened  target  capabilities  that  provide  arming  and fuzing  functions  for  general  purpose  and  penetrating, unitary warheads. The FMU-152/B system operates in three fuze mission phases: the “pre-release,” “pre-arm,” and    “post-arm”    phases.    The    “pre-release”    phase includes all fuze functions performed prior to the point at  which  the  weapon  is  released  from  the  delivery aircraft.    The    “pre-arm”    phase    includes    all    fuze functions   occurring   between   weapon   release   and weapon arming. The “post-arm” phase includes all fuze functions after the weapon is armed. FMU-143E/B ELECTRIC TAIL FUZE The  FMU-143E/B  fuze  (fig.  1-7)  is  used  with  the GBU-24B/B. It is initiated by the FZU-32B/B initiator, which is used to generate and supply power to arm the fuze. The safe condition is verified by the presence of a safety pin or arming wire through the pop-out pin (gag rod). FMU-139 (SERIES) ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-139  (series)  electronic  bomb  fuze  (fig. 1-8) is an electronic impact or impact-delay fuze. It is used in Mk 80 series general-purpose bombs, including laser-guided  bombs.  The  arming  times  are  in-flight selectable, and the functioning delay must be set during weapon  assembly.  There  are  three  arming  times  (2.6, 5.5,   and   10.0   seconds)   and   four   functioning   delay settings (10, 25, and 60 milliseconds, and instantaneous).    Only    2.6/60,    2.6/25,    2.6/10,    and 2.6/inst   high   drag   arm/delay   switch   positions   are authorized  for  Navy/Marine  Corps  use.  The  low  drag arm time switch should always be in the X position. The low drag arm time rotary switch is positioned at X for shipping, storage, and all FFCS (fuze function control set)  use.  The  FMU-139  fuze  differs  from  the  Mk  376 fuze  in  that  the  gag  rod  and  arming  wire  housing  are located in the center of the faceplate (fig. 1-9). ARMING SAFETY SWITCH MK 122 MOD 0 The Mk 122 Mod 0 arming safety switch (fig. 1-10) connects  the  fuze  control  circuits  of  the  bomb  in  the aircraft  to  the  electric  fuze  circuits  in  the  bomb.  This switch provides an open circuit and a RADHAZ shield to prevent electromagnetic radiation from entering the fuze circuits. While  the  weapon  is  loaded,  the  coaxial  cable  of the switch is plugged into the receptacle of the aircraft's electrical  arming  unit.  When  the  bomb  is  suspended from the rack, the lanyard is attached to a fixture on the rack or pylon. Upon bomb release, the lanyard pulls the lanyard pin and closes the fuze circuit. The lanyard is long  enough  so  the  weapon  separates  from  the  bomb rack suspension hooks before the lanyard pin is pulled from  the  switch.  This  ensures  that  the  fuze  does  not receive  charging  voltages  in  case  of  weapon  release failure.  The  coaxial  cable  is  longer  than  the  lanyard, which permits sufficient time for the charging voltage to pass from the electrical arming unit on the aircraft to the fuze electric circuits on the bomb before the cable is pulled free or breaks from the arming unit receptacle. NOTE:   The  Mk  122  Mod  0  switch  must  be installed   and   removed   in   a   RADHAZ-free environment. MK 43 MOD 0 TARGET DETECTING DEVICE The  Mk  43  Mod  0  target-detecting  device  (fig. 1-11)  is  a  proximity  nose  element  that  gives  airburst capability for electric-fuzed Mk 80 (series) bombs. The Mk 43 Mod 0 element is compatible with all electric  tail  fuzes  and  is  identified  by  the  dark  green color  of  the  nose  cone.  A  thermal  battery  powers  its internal  circuitry.  The  thermal  battery  is  initiated  by +300 volts dc or by the striker rod. The  Mk  43  is  initiated  mechanically  (striker  rod) only   when   a   delay   airburst   is   desired.   This   is   the 1-11



Aviation News
Aegean Airlines adds two additional aircraft to its previous A320ceo order
Now seven new aircraft to join the all-Airbus single aisle...
airbus.com
IAE V2500-E5 Engine Receives KC-390 Certification
The fan of an IAE V2500 Engine. Photo: Wikipedia [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Through Clutter or Gunfire: Northrop Grumman’s CIRCM Completes Rigorous Testing
A Northrop Grumman CIRCM. Photo: Northrop Grumman [Avionics Today 08-28-2014]...
aviationtoday.com
Indian Defence Ministry Bans Finmeccanica From Bidding
Although still conducting its investigation into whether senior managers from...
aviationtoday.com
United Nations Mi-8 Downed in Sudan 
The Russian operator of a United Nations chartered Mi-8 helicopter...
aviationtoday.com
CAE New Flight Simulator Demonstrates Interoperability, Networking
CAE demonstrates simulation interoperability and networking for RAAF C-130J aircrews....
aviationtoday.com
AMTC Keynote Speakers Announced
The Air Medical Transport Conference (AMTC) is less than a...
aviationtoday.com
RQ-4 Global Hawk UAS Proves Expanded Mission Capabilities
A Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk. Photo: Wikipedia [Avionics Today...
aviationtoday.com
Beechcraft Delivers to Mexican Navy
Beechraft delivering the T-6C+ aircraft to the Mexican Navy. Photo:...
aviationtoday.com
Pilatus Partners with TASL for PC-12 Assembly
A Pilatus PC-12 in flight. Photo: Pilatus [Avionics Today 08-25-2014]...
aviationtoday.com
Lockheed Martin’s F-35 on Steady Path to IOC
An F-35B aircraft. Photo: Lockheed Martin [Avionics Today 08-25-2014] The...
aviationtoday.com
GE Looks to Lower H Series Fuel Costs
An H80 powered L-410 aircraft. Photo: GE [Avionics Today 08-22-2014]...
aviationtoday.com
MD 530G Shows Its Muscles at Yuma
The MD 530G scout attack helicopter has just completed its...
aviationtoday.com
XTAR and Leidos Team Up to Test AISR
[Avionics Today 08-21-2014] XTAR, LLC signed an agreement with Leidos,...
aviationtoday.com
Unmanned Air, Ground Vehicles Aid Army Mission
An autonomous resupply, reconnaissance, surveillance and target-acquisition demonstration was been...
aviationtoday.com
Lockheed Martin Readies F-16V for Taiwan Launch
A U.S. Air Force F16 in Flight. Photo: Wikipedia [Avionics...
aviationtoday.com
Pilatus Provides a Better View with New EVS
Pilatus PC-12 EVS Sensor. Photo: Pilatus [Avionics Today 08-19-2014] Pilatus...
aviationtoday.com
Manned and Unmanned Systems: Expanding Integration
 X-47B UAS taking off from a carrier in the Eastern...
aviationtoday.com
FAA Statement- New Notice to Airmen Issued for Syria
U.S. operators are restricted from flying in the Damascus Flight...
faa.gov
Northrop Grumman Wins UH-60L to UH-60V Upgrade
Redstone Defence Systems has selected Northrop Grumman to supply its...
aviationtoday.com


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +