Quantcast
FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
Arming is the same in any case. A regulator in the fuze converts the applied voltage to the required level and polarity. It is then applied to the energy storage unit and the 2.6-second timer. If the weapon decelerates, the Mk 31 safety device senses the deceleration and causes the retard switch to close. At 2.6 seconds, the timer completes its cycle and transfers the voltage to the rotor-actuating bellows. The bellows operate and turn the rotor to the armed position. If the weapon does not decelerate, the retard switch does not close. The 2.6-second timer continues to run. At  3.8  seconds,  the  Mk  31  safety  device  causes  the voltage  to  transfer  to  the  input  of  the  rotor-actuating bellows.  At  10.0  seconds,  the  bellows  operates  and turns the rotor to the armed position. FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-152/B  is  an  advanced  fuze  system  for use    in    general    purpose    and    penetrating    unitary warheads.  The  FMU-152/B  provides  safing,  in-flight cockpit selection, and multifunction and multiple delay arming  and  fuzing  functions.  The  FMU-152/B  is  a multifunction; multiple delay fuze system with hardened  target  capabilities  that  provide  arming  and fuzing  functions  for  general  purpose  and  penetrating, unitary warheads. The FMU-152/B system operates in three fuze mission phases: the “pre-release,” “pre-arm,” and    “post-arm”    phases.    The    “pre-release”    phase includes all fuze functions performed prior to the point at  which  the  weapon  is  released  from  the  delivery aircraft.    The    “pre-arm”    phase    includes    all    fuze functions   occurring   between   weapon   release   and weapon arming. The “post-arm” phase includes all fuze functions after the weapon is armed. FMU-143E/B ELECTRIC TAIL FUZE The  FMU-143E/B  fuze  (fig.  1-7)  is  used  with  the GBU-24B/B. It is initiated by the FZU-32B/B initiator, which is used to generate and supply power to arm the fuze. The safe condition is verified by the presence of a safety pin or arming wire through the pop-out pin (gag rod). FMU-139 (SERIES) ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-139  (series)  electronic  bomb  fuze  (fig. 1-8) is an electronic impact or impact-delay fuze. It is used in Mk 80 series general-purpose bombs, including laser-guided  bombs.  The  arming  times  are  in-flight selectable, and the functioning delay must be set during weapon  assembly.  There  are  three  arming  times  (2.6, 5.5,   and   10.0   seconds)   and   four   functioning   delay settings (10, 25, and 60 milliseconds, and instantaneous).    Only    2.6/60,    2.6/25,    2.6/10,    and 2.6/inst   high   drag   arm/delay   switch   positions   are authorized  for  Navy/Marine  Corps  use.  The  low  drag arm time switch should always be in the X position. The low drag arm time rotary switch is positioned at X for shipping, storage, and all FFCS (fuze function control set)  use.  The  FMU-139  fuze  differs  from  the  Mk  376 fuze  in  that  the  gag  rod  and  arming  wire  housing  are located in the center of the faceplate (fig. 1-9). ARMING SAFETY SWITCH MK 122 MOD 0 The Mk 122 Mod 0 arming safety switch (fig. 1-10) connects  the  fuze  control  circuits  of  the  bomb  in  the aircraft  to  the  electric  fuze  circuits  in  the  bomb.  This switch provides an open circuit and a RADHAZ shield to prevent electromagnetic radiation from entering the fuze circuits. While  the  weapon  is  loaded,  the  coaxial  cable  of the switch is plugged into the receptacle of the aircraft's electrical  arming  unit.  When  the  bomb  is  suspended from the rack, the lanyard is attached to a fixture on the rack or pylon. Upon bomb release, the lanyard pulls the lanyard pin and closes the fuze circuit. The lanyard is long  enough  so  the  weapon  separates  from  the  bomb rack suspension hooks before the lanyard pin is pulled from  the  switch.  This  ensures  that  the  fuze  does  not receive  charging  voltages  in  case  of  weapon  release failure.  The  coaxial  cable  is  longer  than  the  lanyard, which permits sufficient time for the charging voltage to pass from the electrical arming unit on the aircraft to the fuze electric circuits on the bomb before the cable is pulled free or breaks from the arming unit receptacle. NOTE:   The  Mk  122  Mod  0  switch  must  be installed   and   removed   in   a   RADHAZ-free environment. MK 43 MOD 0 TARGET DETECTING DEVICE The  Mk  43  Mod  0  target-detecting  device  (fig. 1-11)  is  a  proximity  nose  element  that  gives  airburst capability for electric-fuzed Mk 80 (series) bombs. The Mk 43 Mod 0 element is compatible with all electric  tail  fuzes  and  is  identified  by  the  dark  green color  of  the  nose  cone.  A  thermal  battery  powers  its internal  circuitry.  The  thermal  battery  is  initiated  by +300 volts dc or by the striker rod. The  Mk  43  is  initiated  mechanically  (striker  rod) only   when   a   delay   airburst   is   desired.   This   is   the 1-11



Aviation News
Rolls-Royce to Support V-22 Engines
Rolls-Royce has received $39 million to support AE 1107C engines...
aviationtoday.com
Rockwell Collins Reports on Project Missouri Radio Test
[Avionics Today April 23, 2014] Rockwell Collins released a statement about...
aviationtoday.com
Kestrel Makes sUAS Automation Progress
[Avionics Today April 23, 2014] Lockheed Martin's announced progress with its...
aviationtoday.com
Boeing Stands Out Among Lockheed, Northrop 1st Quarter Results
[Avionics Today April 23, 2014] Three of the world's largest aerospace...
aviationtoday.com
QF16: Unmanned Viper Takes Flight
  A pilotless F-16 during flight. Photo: Boeing The U.S....
aviationtoday.com
The Future of Unmanned Flight
Just five years ago, the idea of the futuristic aircraft...
aviationtoday.com
Sikorsky Flies Optionally Piloted Black Hawk
[Avionics Today April 22, 2014] Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. announced a successful...
aviationtoday.com
Time to Rethink UAS in the US
The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) treatment of very small UAS...
aviationtoday.com
FAA Announces First UAS Test Site Operational
The North Dakota Department of Commerce is ready to start...
faa.gov
Mercury Systems to Provide UAS Processing Modules
[Avionics Today April 21, 2014] Mercury Systems announced a new $3.2...
aviationtoday.com
Airbus Corporate Foundation, JetBlue and Luftfahrt ohne Grenzen send humanitarian aid to Haiti
Ten tonnes of medicine, sheets and blankets shipped on JetBlue...
airbus.com
Northrop Grumman Opens Aircraft Integration Center
[Aviation Today April 16, 2014] Northrop Grumman announced its dedication of...
aviationtoday.com
L-3 TCAS System Selected for KC-46A
[Avionics Today April 18, 2014] Boeing has selected the T3CAS Integrated...
aviationtoday.com
F-35 to Make First U.K. Flight in July
[Avionics Today April 18, 2014] This summer's Royal International Air Tattoo show...
aviationtoday.com
FAA Extends Deadline for Final Helicopter Safety Rule
April 17In response to industry feedback and so that the...
faa.gov
The 2014 AMC/AEEC Conference
[Avionics Today April 17, 2014] 2014 marks the 65th year...
aviationtoday.com
Lockheed Martin F-35 Fleet Tops 15,000 Flight Hours
[Aviation Today, April 16] Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Lightning 2 fleet...
aviationtoday.com
AirAsia to implement Airbus Managed Inventory service
• Automatically replenishing inventory levels at AirAsia facilities • Guaranteeing...
airbus.com
AgustaWestland Offers New Trainer in U.S. Navy Competition
AgustaWestland, manufacturer of the AW119 Koala, brought a new variant...
aviationtoday.com
Sikorsky Starts Naval Air Systems Command Tests for CH-53K
Sikorsky Aircraft has completed the initial series of tests required...
aviationtoday.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +