Quantcast FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
Arming is the same in any case. A regulator in the fuze converts the applied voltage to the required level and polarity. It is then applied to the energy storage unit and the 2.6-second timer. If the weapon decelerates, the Mk 31 safety device senses the deceleration and causes the retard switch to close. At 2.6 seconds, the timer completes its cycle and transfers the voltage to the rotor-actuating bellows. The bellows operate and turn the rotor to the armed position. If the weapon does not decelerate, the retard switch does not close. The 2.6-second timer continues to run. At  3.8  seconds,  the  Mk  31  safety  device  causes  the voltage  to  transfer  to  the  input  of  the  rotor-actuating bellows.  At  10.0  seconds,  the  bellows  operates  and turns the rotor to the armed position. FMU-152/B ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-152/B  is  an  advanced  fuze  system  for use    in    general    purpose    and    penetrating    unitary warheads.  The  FMU-152/B  provides  safing,  in-flight cockpit selection, and multifunction and multiple delay arming  and  fuzing  functions.  The  FMU-152/B  is  a multifunction; multiple delay fuze system with hardened  target  capabilities  that  provide  arming  and fuzing  functions  for  general  purpose  and  penetrating, unitary warheads. The FMU-152/B system operates in three fuze mission phases: the “pre-release,” “pre-arm,” and    “post-arm”    phases.    The    “pre-release”    phase includes all fuze functions performed prior to the point at  which  the  weapon  is  released  from  the  delivery aircraft.    The    “pre-arm”    phase    includes    all    fuze functions   occurring   between   weapon   release   and weapon arming. The “post-arm” phase includes all fuze functions after the weapon is armed. FMU-143E/B ELECTRIC TAIL FUZE The  FMU-143E/B  fuze  (fig.  1-7)  is  used  with  the GBU-24B/B. It is initiated by the FZU-32B/B initiator, which is used to generate and supply power to arm the fuze. The safe condition is verified by the presence of a safety pin or arming wire through the pop-out pin (gag rod). FMU-139 (SERIES) ELECTRONIC BOMB FUZE The  FMU-139  (series)  electronic  bomb  fuze  (fig. 1-8) is an electronic impact or impact-delay fuze. It is used in Mk 80 series general-purpose bombs, including laser-guided  bombs.  The  arming  times  are  in-flight selectable, and the functioning delay must be set during weapon  assembly.  There  are  three  arming  times  (2.6, 5.5,   and   10.0   seconds)   and   four   functioning   delay settings (10, 25, and 60 milliseconds, and instantaneous).    Only    2.6/60,    2.6/25,    2.6/10,    and 2.6/inst   high   drag   arm/delay   switch   positions   are authorized  for  Navy/Marine  Corps  use.  The  low  drag arm time switch should always be in the X position. The low drag arm time rotary switch is positioned at X for shipping, storage, and all FFCS (fuze function control set)  use.  The  FMU-139  fuze  differs  from  the  Mk  376 fuze  in  that  the  gag  rod  and  arming  wire  housing  are located in the center of the faceplate (fig. 1-9). ARMING SAFETY SWITCH MK 122 MOD 0 The Mk 122 Mod 0 arming safety switch (fig. 1-10) connects  the  fuze  control  circuits  of  the  bomb  in  the aircraft  to  the  electric  fuze  circuits  in  the  bomb.  This switch provides an open circuit and a RADHAZ shield to prevent electromagnetic radiation from entering the fuze circuits. While  the  weapon  is  loaded,  the  coaxial  cable  of the switch is plugged into the receptacle of the aircraft's electrical  arming  unit.  When  the  bomb  is  suspended from the rack, the lanyard is attached to a fixture on the rack or pylon. Upon bomb release, the lanyard pulls the lanyard pin and closes the fuze circuit. The lanyard is long  enough  so  the  weapon  separates  from  the  bomb rack suspension hooks before the lanyard pin is pulled from  the  switch.  This  ensures  that  the  fuze  does  not receive  charging  voltages  in  case  of  weapon  release failure.  The  coaxial  cable  is  longer  than  the  lanyard, which permits sufficient time for the charging voltage to pass from the electrical arming unit on the aircraft to the fuze electric circuits on the bomb before the cable is pulled free or breaks from the arming unit receptacle. NOTE:   The  Mk  122  Mod  0  switch  must  be installed   and   removed   in   a   RADHAZ-free environment. MK 43 MOD 0 TARGET DETECTING DEVICE The  Mk  43  Mod  0  target-detecting  device  (fig. 1-11)  is  a  proximity  nose  element  that  gives  airburst capability for electric-fuzed Mk 80 (series) bombs. The Mk 43 Mod 0 element is compatible with all electric  tail  fuzes  and  is  identified  by  the  dark  green color  of  the  nose  cone.  A  thermal  battery  powers  its internal  circuitry.  The  thermal  battery  is  initiated  by +300 volts dc or by the striker rod. The  Mk  43  is  initiated  mechanically  (striker  rod) only   when   a   delay   airburst   is   desired.   This   is   the 1-11



Aviation News
Handover of the first A350 XWB jetliner to Qatar Airways is scheduled for 22 December
Airbus and Qatar Airways are set to open a new...
airbus.com
Ready for service: first A350 XWB delivery follows a robust development programme
The historic delivery of Airbus’ first A350 XWB – which...
airbus.com
Eurocontrol Deploys Second Phase of Variable Division Flight Level
The vDFL concept allows for a more flexible and dynamic...
aviationtoday.com
Connectivity Prompts Honeywell Lab to Test EMI
[Avionics Today 12-19-2014] Honeywell has partnered with the Puerto Rico...
aviationtoday.com
Hawaiian Airlines finalizes A330-800neo order
First U.S. airline to order new aircraft type Share this...
airbus.com
NextGen is Now at JFK
December 18-Passengers traveling through John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport will...
faa.gov
Luxury reaches new heights with the three-room suite on Etihad Airways’ A380
Benefitting from the A380’s spacious interior, Etihad Airways is equipping...
airbus.com
Etihad Airways receives first Airbus A380
Unmatched service and comfort on two decks Share this Read...
airbus.com
UAS in the US: 2014 GAO Report Sees Notable Gains, Room for Improvement
[Avionics Today 12-18-2014] An in-depth report on the FAA’s efforts...
aviationtoday.com
ICAO Leads UAS Fact-Finding Mission
ICAO’s Council President Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu (centre) with U.S. Representative...
aviationtoday.com
Rockwell Collins Receives NAVAIR Contract for ARC-210 System
Rockwell Collins has received a $420 million, four-year contract from...
aviationtoday.com
DOD Assigns MRO&U Providers in Asia Pacific
F-35 Rendering. Photo: Lockheed Martin [Avionics Today 12-18-14] The Department...
aviationtoday.com
Airbus receives over 500 ideas for Fly Your Ideas student challenge
Teams at Airbus now selecting the best 100 concepts Share...
airbus.com
US Coast Guard Flies First Fire Scout
The U.S. Coast Guard, in conjunction with Northrop Grumman Corporation...
aviationtoday.com
IMP Delivers First BLOS-fitted Aurora Aircraft to Canadian Air Force
CP-140M Aurora fitted with IBLOS at IMP Aerospace. Photo: CNW...
aviationtoday.com
CAE Wins $98 Million in Defense Contracts
C295 full-flight simulator. Photo: CAE [Avionics Today 12-17-14] CAE has...
aviationtoday.com
Airbus Helicopters Delivers 2nd Super Puma to Bolivian Air Force
Airbus Helicopters has delivered the second of six Super Puma...
aviationtoday.com
Finnair’s first A350 XWB takes shape
The first A350-900 for Finnair is taking shape in the...
airbus.com
Airbus Helicopters Wins Support Contract for German Army Aviation School
Airbus Helicopters has won a support contract to maintain, overhaul...
aviationtoday.com


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +