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Safety wiring methods

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Step 1. Assemble the unit. Torque the bolts and carefully align the safety wire holes. Step 2. Insert the proper size wire through the hole in the first bolt. Step 3. Bend the left end of the wire clockwise around the bolt head and  under  the other end of the wire. Step 4. Pull the loop tight against the bolt head. Grasp both ends of the wire. Twist them in a clockwise direction until the end of the braid is just short of the second bolt. Step 5. Check to ensure that the loop is still tightly in place around the first bolt head. Grasp the wire with pliers just beyond the end of the braid. While holding it taut, twist it in a clockwise direction until the braid is stiff. NOTE: The braid must be tight enough to resist friction or vibration wear, but should not be overtightened. Step 6. Insert the upper end of the safety wire through the hole in the second bolt. Pull the braid until it is taut. Step 7. Bring the other end of the wire counter- clockwise around the bolt head and under the protruding wire end. Step 8. Tighten the loop and braid the wire ends in a counterclockwise direction. Grasp the wire with the pliers just beyond the end of the braid and twist in a counterclockwise direction until the braid is stiff. Make sure you keep the wire under tension. Step 9. With a final twisting motion, bend the braid to the right and against the head of the bolt. Step 10. Cut the braid, being careful that between three and six full twists still remain. Avoid sharp projecting ends. Figure 5-23 shows various methods commonly used in safety wiring nuts, bolts, and screws. Examples 1, 2, and 5 of figure 5-23 show the proper method of safety wiring bolts, screws, square head plugs, and similar parts when wired in pairs. Examples 6 and 7 show a single-threaded component wired to a housing or lug. Example 3 shows several components wired in series. Example 4 shows the proper method of wiring castellated nuts and studs. Note that there is no loop around the nut. Example 8 shows several components in a closely spaced, closed geometrical pattern, using the single-wire method. When drilled-head bolts, screws, or other parts are grouped together, they are more conveniently safety wired to each other in a series rather than individually. The number of nuts, bolts, or screws that may be safety wired  together  depends  on  the  application.  For instance, when you are safety wiring widely spaced bolts by the double-twist method, a group of three should be the maximum number in a series. When you are safety wiring closely spaced bolts, the number that can be safety wired by a 24-inch length of wire is the maximum in a series. The wire is arranged in such a manner that if the bolt or screw begins to loosen, the force applied to the wire is in the tightening direction. 5-16 ANF0523 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Figure 5-23.—Safety wiring methods.



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